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Review at In These Times!

Thanks, Shaun Richman, for the lovely review at my old workplace (CWA represent). In These Times was where I worked out a lot of the ideas in this book, so excellent to see it reviewed there. They’ll also be co-sponsoring my Chicago appearance next month–stay tuned for details, it’s gonna be so good.

Something is happening. Socialism is no longer a dirty word (the “S-word”), but something a sizeable portion of Americans tell pollsters is their preferred vision for society. It’s no longer an anachronism to speak of “the Left.” A brave and quickly organized movement for black lives has not only sparked a new civil rights movement but has gotten many of us to see the criminal justice system for what it is: the evolution of Jim Crow. Oh, and a hell of a lot more workers are striking than before.

There have been attempts to describe this emerging movement for social justice in book form before. The latest, Necessary Trouble: Americans in Revolt by Sarah Jaffe, is the best so far. The Nation Books publication was released Tuesday.

Jaffe, a freelance writer whose work has appeared everywhere from In These Times to The Guardian and The Atlantic, is a leading light in the new generation of labor and social justice reporters.

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The Washington Post reviews Necessary Trouble!

With her broader vision of inequality in mind, Jaffe skillfully debunks the “false dichotomy” between social issues and economic ones, so typical in our political debates. The so-called culture wars are not a mere wedge issue but a way of securing economic and political power, she argues. ‘ “Social” issues serve to create and perpetuate inequality, erecting barriers to full participation in society for certain groups. They shape our idea of who is a full citizen, and they also shape the very real material conditions of people’s lives.’

The Washington Post

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“The left’s new revolutionary masterpiece” Review at Patheos!

This review was so good it made me blush. Thanks, Dan!

It isn’t often a book comes along that has the ability to forever change the narrative when we talk about what a political revolution is and what it means for Americans. When you have two very loud groups fighting for control of what the future of the country should look like, this book comes along and lays out what the fight is really about. It blows that media hyperbole; it doesn’t rely on flashy headlines to villainize one group over another. It takes a real and honest look at the revolutionary movements taking place in our country and Jaffe masterfully explains the movements like no author or journalist has done before.

Read the rest at Patheos.